Past Gives Clue To Climate Impact

Posted on Friday, January 06 at 09:03 by Ed Deak
The new study, by Flavia Nunes and Richard Norris from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California, looked at tiny fossil animals called foraminifera in marine sediments from 14 ocean-floor locations around the world. Analysing the ratios of two isotopes of carbon in the shells of these foraminifera allowed them to determine ocean current patterns at the time the creatures died. The time in question was an extraordinary epoch in Earth history - the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), when the global average temperature rose by anything between four and seven Celsius in a few thousand years. http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/science/nature/4582872.stm Published: 2006/01/05 09:04:33 GMT BBC MMVI

Note: http://news.bbc.co.uk/g...

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