Alleged Hijacking Of ‘Net Link By Rights Officials ‘Horrible’

Posted on Monday, April 28 at 10:25 by akston

 

Colin Perkel, THE CANADIAN PRESS
Apr 28, 2008 04:30 AM

Woman disturbed to learn her Internet connection possibly used to post notes on supremacist sites

A woman caught up in a mysterious Internet hijacking scandal that has sparked a federal privacy investigation into the Canadian Human Rights Commission says she was shocked, angry and confused at suddenly finding herself publicly associated with white supremacists.

Speaking out for the first time, Nelly Hechme told The Canadian Press she was appalled to learn commission investigators might have hacked her Internet connection to post messages on supremacist websites.

“It’s horrible,” Hechme said. “You never want something like that attached to your name.”

Last month, an investigator with the Human Rights Commission told a hearing into a hate complaint that he made postings on websites under the password-protected pseudonym “Jadewarr.”

In response to a subpoena, Bell Canada linked “Jadewarr” to Hechme’s personal Internet account, and provided her address and telephone number at the public hearing. The revelation quickly found its way into the media and became the Internet buzz among opponents of the commission.

Hechme, 26, who lives close to the commission’s offices in Ottawa, said she was “completely shocked” when a reporter contacted her about the disclosure.

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  1. Sun Apr 27, 2008 10:05 pm
    There's much more on this @ http://www.freedomsite.org/legal/CHRC_c ... laint.html

    Have a look at the photos showing the location of the CHRC offices and the apartment of Ms. Hechme. To me, it looks like a good 300 meters. While I'm no WiFi expert, I do know that inside an apartment made of concrete 30 feet would be difficult. Outside, in open air, 100-150 m might be possible. So how did the CHRC get access to a wireless router 300 m away without using powerful hardware designed for just such a purpose?

  2. Sat Jun 21, 2008 5:11 am
    What You Don’t Know About Cuba

    Cuba was known as the whorehouse of the Caribbean and it gained a reputation as the capital of American vice shortly after the start of Prohibition in 1920.


    * Christopher Guly


    Just a few weeks before the next president of the United States takes the oath of office this January, Cubans will mark the 50th anniversary of the rise to power of America’s great nemesis, Fidel Castro.

    Though many in the United States have denounced Castro (and his brother Raúl, who recently replaced the ailing Fidel) as a ruthless dictator, those same critics may wish to consider how the US created the climate that gave rise to Cuba’s communist revolution in 1959.

    Though initially supportive of Cuba’s bid for independence from Spain in the Spanish-American War of 1898, the US quickly turned Cuba into a “quasi-colony.” In 1910, Congress passed the Platt Amendment, which gave America almost complete control of Cuba’s foreign and debt policies. It also secured the rights to the Guantánamo Bay naval base, which is now home to America’s “enemy combatants” in its War on Terror. All major decisions concerning Cuba went through the US ambassador.

    David Welch, a political science professor at the University of Toronto says that “the Cubans believe very strongly that the Americans imposed themselves as colonial masters and made the country their own private playground.”

    A recent story in Maclean’s magazine pointed out that Cuba was known as “the whorehouse of the Caribbean” and that it gained a reputation as “the capital of American vice” shortly after the start of Prohibition in 1920 when Cuba was used as “a giant warehouse” for liquor smuggled into the US.

    Infamous American mobsters such as Meyer Lansky, Charles “Lucky” Luciano and Giuseppe Bonanno were given free reign. The most influential mafia members would meet in Lansky’s suite at Havana’s Hotel Nacional and divvy up the proceeds from prostitution and casinos. Lansky was the kingpin, having arrived in Cuba about a decade before to help boost the revenues of two casinos at Havana’s famous Oriental Park racetrack.

    The Americans came in hordes. Few Cubans benefited, aside from the Cuban military, which controlled most of the country’s gaming operations and which included Fulgencio Batista, the US-backed Cuban general who would twice take control of the country by coup. By the time of the 1959 revolution, Cuba was a perfect storm of heavy-handed US government policy and illicit business activity.

    Growing up, Castro was well aware of the American presence, though he wasn’t always a fierce critic. A young Castro wrote a letter to President Franklin Delano Roosevelt asking for a “ten dollar bill green American” and, as an adult, Castro spent a three-month honeymoon with his first wife in Miami and New York.

    Still, the social justice-tinged education Castro received in high school from the Jesuits made him increasingly wary of the heavy American influence. After graduating with a law degree in 1950, he set up a legal practice for a mainly impoverished clientele disconnected from the American wealth surrounding them.

    Castro had a “very, very strong contempt for games and casinos,” and they were the first to be dismantled when Batista’s regime fell, says Yvon Grenier, chair of the political science department at St. Francis Xavier University. “These money machines were seen as symbols of corruption of the Batista regime.”
    Waiting to be shot!

    But had history not unfolded as it did, Cuba could have become one of the top entertainment hubs for Americans. Its gaming industry was ramping up in the 1950s, with Luciano running several casinos sanctioned by Batista.

    Meanwhile, Lansky became a major investor in the city’s Hotel Habana Riviera, which was poised to rival the Flamingo hotel and casino he was involved with in the Nevada desert. “Havana would be Las Vegas today if there had not been a revolution,” says Welch. “It would have been a destination for gambling, prostitution and all the rest of it.”

    Cuba’s moral arena and the freedoms that the country has given up, willfully or because of sanctions, often define outside perspectives of the country. Prostitution is a thriving industry while many luxuries, such as cell phones, were largely banned until recently. Now, under Raúl, changes are occurring quickly. Cubans can purchase computers and, if they can afford it, stay at the beach resorts created for rich westerners.

    A positive future relationship could emerge between the US and Cuba, should Democrat Barack Obama succeed in winning the presidency in November and follow through with his intent to begin a dialogue with Raúl Castro. There is increasing debate in the US about lifting the trade and travel embargo.

    Whatever the future of this proudly independent country might be, it seems the tiny island may never entirely shake the influence of its giant neighbor.



  3. by avatar RUEZ
    Sat Jun 21, 2008 5:16 am
    Go figure, even Streakers Cuba article is anti-American. Nice try one trick.

  4. Sat Jun 21, 2008 5:18 am
    The article doesn't exactly glorify Castro, you might have noticed.

  5. by avatar RUEZ
    Sat Jun 21, 2008 5:22 am
    "Streaker" said
    The article doesn't exactly glorify Castro, you might have noticed.

    I thought at least you were posting something different. I was going to give you credit for changing things up.

  6. Sat Jun 21, 2008 6:15 am
    good article

  7. Sat Jun 21, 2008 7:42 am
    "RUEZ" said
    Go figure, even Streakers Cuba article is anti-American. Nice try one trick.


    I know eh? I loved the line about Prohibition. Oh God Cubans were making money! The fucking horror. Canada was whoring itself too, and I bet the rest of them were just as happy to do it, Cuba just was the biggest freaking island

  8. Sat Jun 21, 2008 4:04 pm
    "RUEZ" said
    The article doesn't exactly glorify Castro, you might have noticed.

    I thought at least you were posting something different. I was going to give you credit for changing things up.

    Bull. You can't discuss Castro and Cuba without any mention of America's (very negative) historical role in that nation.

  9. by avatar Benoit
    Sat Jun 21, 2008 4:21 pm
    A direct descendant of Mark Anthony DeWolf, the first slaver in the DeWolf family, lets us discover the journey from Rhode Island to Ghana to Cuba and back, recapitulating the Triangle Trade that made the DeWolfs the largest slave-trading family in U.S. She is retracing early America's infamous trade in rum, slaves and sugar.

    http://www.pbs.org/previews/pov-tracesofthetrade/

  10. by avatar RUEZ
    Sat Jun 21, 2008 4:25 pm
    "Streaker" said
    The article doesn't exactly glorify Castro, you might have noticed.

    I thought at least you were posting something different. I was going to give you credit for changing things up.

    Bull. You can't discuss Castro and Cuba without any mention of America's (very negative) historical role in that nation.
    Maybe, the point is you don't do much on this forum without it being anti-American.

  11. by avatar Benoit
    Sat Jun 21, 2008 4:38 pm
    The DeWolf family fortune was built in part on buying and selling human beings. Over fifty years and three generations, from 1769 to 1820, the DeWolfs were the nation's leading slave traders. They brought approximately 10,000 Africans from the west coast of Africa to auction blocks in Charleston, South Carolina and other southern U.S. ports; to Havana, Cuba and to other ports in the Caribbean; to their own sugar plantations in Cuba; and into their own homes. The family continued in the trade despite state and federal laws prohibiting many of their activities in the late 1700s. Their efforts to circumvent those laws eventually lead them to arrange a political favor with President Thomas Jefferson, who agreed to split the federal customs district based in Newport, R.I. This maneuver permitted the appointment of a customs inspector just for Bristol, and the choice was Charles Collins, the brother-in-law of James DeWolf, who conveniently ignored the slave ships moving in and out of harbor. One member of the family, George DeWolf, even continued in the trade after 1808, when Congress banned the importation of slaves into the U.S., until 1820, when Congress made slave trading a hanging offense. Their complicity in slavery continued even afterwards, however, as the family maintained slave plantations in Cuba and James DeWolf invested his slave trade profits in textile mills which used slave-produced cotton. Today, there are as many as half a million living descendants of the people traded as chattel by the DeWolfs.

    http://www.tracesofthetrade.org/guides- ... lf-family/

  12. Sat Jun 21, 2008 4:57 pm
    "Benoit" said
    The DeWolf family fortune was built in part on buying and selling human beings. Over fifty years and three generations, from 1769 to 1820, the DeWolfs were the nation's leading slave traders. They brought approximately 10,000 Africans from the west coast of Africa to auction blocks in Charleston, South Carolina and other southern U.S. ports; to Havana, Cuba and to other ports in the Caribbean; to their own sugar plantations in Cuba; and into their own homes. The family continued in the trade despite state and federal laws prohibiting many of their activities in the late 1700s. Their efforts to circumvent those laws eventually lead them to arrange a political favor with President Thomas Jefferson, who agreed to split the federal customs district based in Newport, R.I. This maneuver permitted the appointment of a customs inspector just for Bristol, and the choice was Charles Collins, the brother-in-law of James DeWolf, who conveniently ignored the slave ships moving in and out of harbor. One member of the family, George DeWolf, even continued in the trade after 1808, when Congress banned the importation of slaves into the U.S., until 1820, when Congress made slave trading a hanging offense. Their complicity in slavery continued even afterwards, however, as the family maintained slave plantations in Cuba and James DeWolf invested his slave trade profits in textile mills which used slave-produced cotton. Today, there are as many as half a million living descendants of the people traded as chattel by the DeWolfs.

    http://www.tracesofthetrade.org/guides- ... lf-family/


    Interesting. Nicely illustrates the kind of economic relationship the US has had with Cuba for centuries.

  13. by avatar herbie
    Sat Jun 21, 2008 6:29 pm

    Maybe, the point is you don't do much on this forum without it being anti-American.


    I thought this was a forum. That would entail making sure Canadians are aware of the history rather than just the Bush-ite revisionisms portraying the USA as bright-eyed innocents.
    Canada sold liquor during the Prohibition too. But to claim we were 'whoring out' like Cuba would earn you a crack in the head from any old-timer. They were the generation that made Canada.

  14. by avatar Benoit
    Sat Jun 21, 2008 7:31 pm
    The Americans came in hordes. Few Cubans benefited, aside from the Cuban military, which controlled most of the country’s gaming operations and which included Fulgencio Batista, the US-backed Cuban general who would twice take control of the country by coup. By the time of the 1959 revolution, Cuba was a perfect storm of heavy-handed US government policy and illicit business activity.


    "Batista was well liked by American interests, who had feared Grau's socialistic reforms and saw him as a stabilizing force with respect for American interests. It was in this time period that Batista formed a renowned friendship and business relationship with American gangster Meyer Lansky that lasted over three decades.

    "Through Lansky, the Mafia knew they had a friend in Cuba. Gangster Lucky Luciano, after being deported to Italy in 1946, went to Havana with a false passport. A summit at Havana's Hotel Nacional, with mobsters such as Frank Costello, Vito Genovese, Santo Trafficante, Jr., Moe Dalitz, and others, confirmed Luciano's authority over the U.S. mob and coincided with Frank Sinatra's singing debut in Havana. It was here that Lansky gave permission to kill Bugsy Siegel.

    "Many of Batista's enemies faced the same fate as the ambitious Siegel. One of his most bitter opponents, Antonio Guiteras (founder of the student group Joven Cuba) was gunned down by government forces in 1935 while waiting for a boat in Matanzas province. Others just seemed to disappear into thin air."

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fulgencio_Batista



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